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Mamacita’s Hookah Lounge

January 01, 2012

Eric Escamilla

Eric Escamilla and his partner knew every bar and restaurant in San Angelo, and felt it was time San Angelo experienced a lounge of a different kind: a hookah lounge. While there was already one in existence, Eric felt San Angelo could use a second one to increase the exposure of this type of establishment to San Angelo natives.

Eric sought the help of Business Advisor Pedro Ramirez from Angelo State University’s Small Business Development Center. Throughout the process, Eric established his hookah lounge and opened the doors in the early 2010, but more help was required. After weathering the initial months, Advisor Ramirez continued helping Eric to establish and grow his following. With his help, Eric was able to increase his sales and relocated to a new location. The new business location increased the business’ visibility and clientele quality.

After over six months, the hookah lounge is progressing strongly and Eric is looking to add a salsa club in the future. For now, San Angelo natives can continue enjoying the exotic aromas and tobacco’s offered in Eric’s Mamacita’s Hookah Lounge.

 

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