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Angelo State University
Department of Psychology, Sociology and Social Work

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Teresa Elizabeth Hack, Ph.D.

Department of Psychology, Sociology and Social Work

Associate Professor
325-486-6121
  • Ph.D., (2008) Purdue University
  • M.S., (2005) Purdue University
  • B.A., (2002) Indiana University-Kokomo           
  • Undergraduate: General Psychology, Introduction to Social Psychology, Advanced Social Psychology, Research Methods
  • Graduate: Social Psychology             

My broad research interests include intergroup relations. More specifically, I use a social cognitive approach to examine processes involved in stereotyping and prejudice, as well as to investigate how perceptions of social group members affect social behavior.

  • Hack, T. E., & Monteith, M. J. (2008, May). “Just Kidding!”: The consequences of friendly intergroup teases. Paper presented at the annual Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.
  • Hack, T. E., & Carlston, D. E. (2008, February). The effects of smiling on perceived warmth and competence. Presented at the annual meeting for the Society of Personality and Social Psychology, Albuquerque, NM.
  • Carlston, D. E., & Hack, T. E., (2007). Person Memory. International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, 2nd Edition. New York: MacMillan.
  • Hack, T. E., & Goodwin, S. A. (2007, May). Role of group membership in evaluations of warmth and competence. Paper presented at the annual Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.
  • Hack, T. E., & Carlston, D. E. (2007, April). Which books get judged by their covers? The effects of facial expression and trait dimension on ratings of photographed faces. Paper presented at the bi-annual conference of Social Psychologists of Indiana (SPI), West Lafayette, IN.        

Dr. (Tay) Hack teaches classes in psychology, including social psychology, cultural psychology, and the psychology of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination.  She is a member of the Film Studies Committee and has a special interest in how film can powerfully affect our perceptions, and influence how we view the world around us. In her course of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination she explores how films in contemporary society reflect social psychological theories and perspectives.

At ASU since 2008.

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